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Keep Hope Alive

Keep Hope Alive

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Keep Hope Alive

By Dr. Nahida Gordon

Since 2001 Israel through its military and settlers in the West Bank and Gaza has uprooted and taken, burnt and destroyed hundreds of thousands of olive trees that belong to Palestinian farmers who depend on the olive tree for their livelihood.

As an act of solidarity and support The Synod of the Covenant hopes to join individuals and many other organizations including churches, church related organizations from around the world to help Palestinian farmers keep Hope Alive by distributing and planting olive trees.

The Campaign, though its network of friends and partners brings awareness about Palestine and encourages others to get involved. The Campaign serves both an educational, lobbying, and advocacy tool, which target policies that continue to support the ongoing land confiscation, and also serves to stabilize the Palestinian farmers’ economic situation by allowing them to continue to stay on their land and provide a livelihood.

In addition to donating trees, there are two other ways to Keep Hope Alive.  One is planting the trees that have been donated – and this occurs in February.  And the other is the harvesting of the olives, which occurs in early October.  Settlers and the Israeli military frequently interfere with the harvest and the settlers quite often steel the harvest. I had the privilege of joining this campaign several years ago.  It was an extremely meaningful experience.  We had the opportunity to pick olives with 70 other individuals from many counties including the United States. One of my fellow pickers was the daughter of Holocaust survivors and she reached out to me to let me know how important it was for her to help the Palestinians in their steadfastness.

In spite of the destruction of the very foundations of their existence, Palestinian women, men and children are committed to rebuilding their society without the use of violence. They need our support and involvement.

I hope you will donate to this meaningful activity and I encourage you to travel to Palestine and take part in either the planting or the harvesting of the olive tree.  I think you will find it to be a life altering experience.

Keep Hope Alive Campaign — http://jai-pal.org/index.php/en/campaigns/olive-tree-campaign/sponsor-trees

“Finally Comes the Poet”

“Finally Comes the Poet”

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“Finally Comes the Poet”

Community Worship for the Inauguration of Dr. Susan Hasseler
“Finally Comes the Poet”
John 1:1-5, Matthew 5:14-16, Isaiah 40:25-31
Rev. Anne Weirich, April 2, 2017, 7pm
College Drive Presbyterian Church

The first several times that I drove into New Concord – about four years ago – I always came on on highway 40.  During my interviews, the church had been putting me up at one of the hotels at Airport Road, and it was late April – just as the redbud trees are starting to show their beautiful blossoms.  I think that the search committee wanted me to see the how pretty that drive can be.

When I came to New Concord to move here – later in July – I came all the way to the 83 exit.  My friend was behind me driving the moving van and we thought it might be better to stay on 70 as long as possible.

I’ll never forget my first view of the village from the Interstate.  I hadn’t quite realized just how much the university and parts of town are really quite like a city on the hill.

Most of the time, when I’ve seen cities on hills, the prominent buildings on the ridge are the churches.  And it’s true that it’s easy to catch a glimpse of Westminster Church from the highway.

But it’s really the buildings of the university that stand out.

I remember appreciating the image.   I liked the idea that perhaps there was a great deal of thought that may have gone into placing the first building – right to the north here – on a promontory.

It’s good way to raise up the importance of education I suppose – by putting the buildings high on a hill.

The Presbyterians who helped build places like Muskingum University certainly held education in high esteem.  When asked about the greatest commandment, Jesus said, that we were to “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind’; and, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’”  (Luke 10:27)  Presbyterians and their Congregationalist colleagues took the “with all your mind” seriously and supported all kinds of education for children and adults.

Heart-love for God – soul-love for God – these are gifts I think.  We were made for God and our hearts and souls or spirits are restless and searching for God.  We can strengthen these aspects of our love for God through practices like prayer and worship and reaching out compassion and practicing grace through seeking reconciliation.  This is how we love in strength.  We focus – we increase the strength of our lens – on these practices and connections to bring ourselves closer to God.

When we love God with our minds, I think it’s a bit different.

I think it is this aspect of loving God that calls us out in the world in ways that can be stunning in richness.  When we love God with our minds, we exercise our minds – we discipline our minds to study the world around us.  With eyes of faith, we seek out the secrets God has hidden there for us to discover.  And if we are loving God with our minds, and getting it right – then we use what we find for good and we teach what truth we have learned to the next generation, and we grow in wonder at the “Creator of the ends of the earth.  [Who] does not faint or grow weary;  [whose] understanding is unsearchable.”

It can work the other way, too.  Sometimes the elegance or the mystery that the mind encounters while searching out the way things work in the world, can overcome us with the knowledge that there is something – some power – some force for life – that must be the ground of all being.  So our minds, engaged in the work of academia, can lead us to love God.

I believe we love God with our minds, because God is Mind – a mind that is so immense that it is unsearchable, says Isaiah.

What could be more indicative of that than one of our names for the Lord – the name Word?  “In the beginning was the Word.”  God spoke us – used language – to bring us into the world.  And words – language – is one of the great repositories of our knowledge.   Our minds – and our souls and our hearts – are quenched from the endless well of words that is God still speaking.  God still creates, still uses speech to give strength to our fainting, weary efforts….helping us, lifting us, so that even when we are most exhausted, most dejected, confused, depleted or discouraged, we suddenly find ourselves soaring easily like a kettle of eagles in a morning thermal.  We are renewed – given life – revived by the Word – by the Mind of God.

And when the Word brings life, it brings light, too….

So when we love God with our minds, we are seeking God’s light – which chases away the darkness in all its forms.

As those who love the light – those who love with our minds – we are then called to run that light up the hill – to show how God’s mind works in us and in the world.

We say, “Have you not known?  Have you not heard?”

We say, “Don’t hide, don’t despair.  Lift your eyes on high and see what the Mind of God has brought to light!  Put it high on the lamp stand!”

This is certainly the Word that the second prophet of the great Isaiah prophecy was bringing to Israel.

There had been 160 years of silence between the end of Chapter 39 and these words of comfort to the exiled people of God in Chapter 40.

Conquerors and political infighting and corruption had decimated God’s people and now they wept, the Psalmist tells us, by the rivers of Babylon.  The Temple and the holy city on the hill, Jerusalem, were in ruins.  And Isaiah was sent by God to bring a word of healing and hope and restoration to God’s people.

And this healing and hope was not only spoken to the heart and the soul and spirit of the people of God.  It was spoken in concrete terms.  This was to be a restoration of all things.  The Word of God, the Mind of God spoke and said that everything was going to be reordered.

And this is because God spoke to Israel with a very special kind of word …  the Mind of God was given to the exhausted, weary, fearful, broken and dispersed people as lines of poetry.

Walter Bruggeman writes – with great vocabulary and gusto,

It is an intellectual travesty, such an act of chutz-pah, such a subversive poetic utterance that dumps a poem in the midst of resignation. The poem works a newness, not because it is good poetry, but because the subject of the poem, the God who lives in and through and with and under such outrageous assertions, is at work overriding despair, inviting hope, responding to our waiting and starting the world free again, outside the regimes of weariness… The key religious question among us is whether there is grounds for an alternative rooted not in self-preoccupation or in deadening stability but rooted in a more awesome reality that lives underneath empires, that comes among us as an odd poem, as inscrutable as power, as dangerous as new life, as fragile as waiting.  The poet names the name and imagines new life, like eagles flying, running, walking.
(A Way Other Than Our Own, Westminster/John Knox:Louisville, 2017, p. 58-59.)

So, when we love God with our minds – we are called – I think – to this ‘intellectual travesty’ of poetry.

To quote the preacher Bruggeman again, “poets speak against a prose world.”  (Finally Comes the Poet,” Augsburg Fortress:  Mnpls, 1989, p. 3.)   And a prose world isn’t bad.  But it can be settled into complacency and riddled with disinformation or “alternative facts.”

When we love God with our minds, we are capable of the kind of speech that raises us up.  Not by proclaiming doctrine or parsing morality or solving problems.  But by bringing an alternative word – a poem – about an existence that is formed by the Word and mind and heart and strength of God.

Our poetry – whether it’s preaching from a pulpit or a formula inscribed on a white board in a classroom or scattered in the notes and staff of a musical score or a proposal at the board of trustees meeting,  teamwork on the basketball court or the compassion needed to tend the sick or when we prepare a lesson plan or defend a dissertation or a point of history or politics or philosophy – our poetry is needed.  Poetry is the language of God – prophetic language that has power – “shattering, evocative speech that breaks fixed conclusions and presses us always toward new, [even] dangerous [and] imaginative possibilities.”  (Ibid., p. 6)

The title of this sermon came from the poet Walt Whitman.  He wrote,

After the seas are all cross’d, (as they seem already cross’d,) After the great captains and engineers have accomplish’d all their work, After the noble inventors, after the scientists, the chemist, the geologist, ethnologist, Finally shall come the poet worthy that name, The true son of God shall come singing his songs. (“Passage to India,” 5:1101-5 Leaves of Grass, Mentor Books:  NY, 1954, p. 324.)

In other words, God will have the final word.

And if we be poets in the meantime, we will shine the light of our alternative realities – from this village on the hill – into a future that we cannot quite see.

This is how we show that we cherish the truth – that we are open to the truth – that we are not afraid of the truth that can break the fearful realities that can bind us and divide us and reduce us to a fainthearted and stumbling people.

And, Dr. Susan Hassler… even though I’ve known you for just a little while…  I think you can receive the mantle of inauguration as a poet.  Already, we’ve seen your grace and openness and energy and imagination.  I think we’ve even seen a little chutz-pah. You seem to know already about loving God and others with your mind.

And I believe I can speak for us all to say that we look forward to your inauguration into this calling as President at Muskingum University.

I think the time is right for your poetry here.

And, I can’t help but smile and be struck by what I consider an act of poetry in the word “inauguration.”

The word itself is rooted in the French term for install or consecrate.  But in the deeper meaning – the Latin root – it infers that these installations need to take place when the time is right.  The root word is “augury.”  Augury is the practice of searching in creation for the signs of the right time for moving forward.

The Latin word inaugurare means to “take omens from the flight of birds before consecrating or installing.” (http://www.dictionary.com/browse/inauguration?s=t)

Seems like the one true poet is bringing us right back to the promised flight of eagles…

Sounds poetic in the deepest sense of that word…

Poetic, meaning we may we all take heart that as we move toward to your inauguration on Friday, as we move into the whole future beyond where we can see, we can be sure that we are carried along on the wings of eagles – with our way illuminated by the light of the Holy One – the Word – the Poet – the Everlasting God.

Amen

Rev. Anne Weirich

Currently the pastor at College Drive Presbyterian Church in New Concord, OH – home of Muskingum University and John Glenn – Anne is a graduate of Princeton Seminary (MDiv. 1998.) Prior to this, she has served a UCC church on Cape Cod, Claremont Presbyterian Church in CA, and Westminster, Grand Rapids, MI and First Presbyterian in Lansing, MI. She travels annually to the Holy Land, leading pilgrimages and has also worked with many PCUSA mission activities and partners including PDA in New Orleans, the Border Ministry and the World Communion of Reformed Churches. Currently Anne serves on the executive committee of the General Assembly Committee for Ecumenical and Interfaith Relations.

Learn about Rev. Weirich’s latest trip to Israel/Palestine.

Download Pilgrimage 2018 Registration form.

“Christ’s Call to Witness in the Middle East”

“Christ’s Call to Witness in the Middle East”

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“Christ’s Call to Witness in the Middle East”

Assembly Meeting
Friday • November 4, 2016 • 12:30pm
Chirst Presbyterian Church • 4225 West Sylvania Ave. Toledo, OH 43623

Keynote Speaker: Amgad  Beblawi

Amgad  Beblawi was coordinator of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)’s mission in the Middle East and Europe for the past six years. As such, he serves as a resource for PC(USA) global partners, PC(USA) mission participants, and mission personnel engaged in God’s mission in these regions.

Amgad served for the previous five years as the Presbyterian Mission Agency’s associate for Middle Eastern congregational support in the United States.

Amgad holds master’s degrees in theology and biblical studies from Fuller Theological Seminary, in the Evangelical Presbyterian Church in Egypt.

Amgad lives in Louisville, KY. with his wife Susan Templet Beblawi, and son Justin.

christs-call-to-witness-in-the-middle-east

Featuring: Synod of the Covenant Mission Partners for 2016
Hany Gad Beshay Mikhail, George Shukri Makhlouf, Salam Hanna, Cathrine N.A. Abuamsha, and Mary Mikhael

Rebuilding in Homs, life slowly returns in Syrian city devastated by civil war

Rebuilding in Homs, life slowly returns in Syrian city devastated by civil war

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Rebuilding in Homs, life slowly returns in Syrian city devastated by civil war

It is estimated that more than 250,000 Syrians have died since civil war broke out in the country five years ago. Another seven million are displaced. The United Nations and other world organizations say the crisis has set Syria’s development status back by four decades.

The city of Homs and the art painted in the streets by residents after they returned from three years of exile while extremists held the city. About 400 families have returned so far and say they don’t plan to leave again. —Scott Parker

The city of Homs and the art painted in the streets by residents after they returned from three years of exile while extremists held the city. About 400 families have returned so far and say they don’t plan to leave again. —Scott Parker

While more than four million people have left Syria for other countries, those that remain hope to one day see their country at peace and thriving. Presbyterian Disaster Assistance, in partnership with the National Evangelical Synod of Syria and Lebanon (NESSL) has been helping Syrian Christians rebuild their homes through a $100,000 grant.

As part of her visit to the Middle East, PDA Coordinator, the Rev. Dr. Laurie Kraus joined other organizations for a conference in Lebanon, followed by a visit to Syria where the PDA dollars are at work restoring life to the city of Homs.

“We met with hundreds of people displaced from Homs and other towns and cities in Syria who had either been threatened or were forced to leave by ISIL,” said Kraus. “I talked with families that had been there for five years. They left during the initial fighting in Homs in February 2012 and haven’t gone back.”

Kraus met with a displaced couple who had resettled in the Christian Valley of Syria. The man is a dentist and recently opened a practice in his new community. Both say they are not stigmatized but do not feel fully received by the community. However, there are challenges to returning to life in Homs.

“There are concerns about reestablishing a viable work life in Homs because the city and its economy are still very fragile,” said Kraus. “There are many many buildings and apartments in Homs that are not rebuilt, on blocks that remain filled with rubble and empty of people. Do they go home to a rehabilitated apartment or do they stay where they have work and their children are in school? There’s a tension either way and it is not a simple homecoming story. Further, many families experienced trauma as they endured assaults on Homs and eventually fled, and those feelings linger, making a decision to return more complicated.”

Kraus and the rest of the team heard similar stories through out their visit as people struggle with remaining in a devastated community or seeking to start anew in another city or country.

“It reminds me of many families that fled New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Some had to move to other states and never came back,” said Kraus. “So there’s a whole layer of story and pathos unfolding around hard choices they’re still going to have to make about where they want to invest their lives and try to re-create healing and wholeness for themselves and their families. It’s not an easy decision.”

In her talks with community leaders and residents, Kraus said there is a common belief and commitment from Christian, Orthodox and Muslim faiths that Homs must be restored. She says the interfaith groups believe that a multi-religious cultural environment is very important to the recovery and stability of Syria.

The city of Homs and the art painted in the streets by residents after they returned from three years of exile while extremists held the city. About 400 families have returned so far and say they don’t plan to leave again.
 

While touring the devastation in Homs, Kraus saw the impact of the bombing and shelling on the religious community.

“You’d walk down the block and see a wrecked church or Orthodox communion and mosque, all within steps of each other,” she said. “Apartment buildings looked like pancakes after being leveled by the bombing.”

Despite the devastation, a few families at a time, are beginning to make their way back into their restored apartments.

“One family’s flat had been completely restored while the one next to it was still in ruins. Most of us wouldn’t go back into a building where there were no other restored apartments, especially when the building next to it could collapse at any moment,” she said. “But people are going back into buildings like this. They are making a commitment to rebuild flat by flat, house by house.”

Kraus talked with one couple, an engineer and a pediatrician, who had returned to their home and were the only ones living in their block.

“Their block is dark at night. There is no one else in their building or on their street,” Kraus said. “The wife goes out at 3:00 in the morning to make house calls on children. They’re living like pioneers at a frontier outpost. They are living there because they believe it’s the only way to bring back their city.”

Kraus says she’s deeply moved when she thinks about what these families and communities are giving up in order to rebuild their life in Homs. But people are coming back. They’re going to school and they’re teaching.

“I met with an elder after church who was so proud when he shared about his son who is a high school senior,” she said. “Many young people want to leave the city when they can, but his son wants to stay and go to school in Syria so he can help people come back and build a life. A lot of people have given up on Syria but they haven’t seen the people we’ve seen who are just working day and night to make it happen. We want to work with this community to continue the rebuilding, which we believe Presbyterians will be generous in supporting.”

Source: http://www.pcusa.org/news/2016/5/6/rebuilding-homs-life-slowly-returns-syrian-city-de/

Support grows for national boycott of Wendy’s Restaurants

Support grows for national boycott of Wendy’s Restaurants

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Support grows for national boycott of Wendy’s Restaurants

The Coalition of Immokalee Workers (CIW) has been trying for 10 years to convince the Wendy’s company to join the Fair Food Program (FFP), which focuses on the rights of farmworkers. Despite its pleas, the Ohio-based fast food company has said no. Now the CIW is ramping up its campaign by calling for a national boycott of the food chain. This is only the second time in the group’s history that a national boycott has been called. The first time was 15 years ago against Taco Bell.

Coalition of Immokalee Workers and supporters demonstrate against Wendy’s Restaurants in March on the campus of the University of Louisville. —Andrew Kang Bartlett

Coalition of Immokalee Workers and supporters demonstrate against Wendy’s Restaurants in March on the campus of the University of Louisville. —Andrew Kang Bartlett

The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) has supported the CIW from the beginning as it worked to secure Fair Food agreements from Yum Brands, McDonald’s, Burger King and Subway. At its recent meeting in Louisville, the Presbyterian Mission Agency Board officially endorsed the call for a national boycott.

“Rather than support Florida growers who uphold human rights under the Fair Food Program, Wendy’s switched its tomato purchases to Mexico, where the denial of human rights in the produce industry was well-documented in last year’s Los Angeles Times expose,” said the Rev. Gradye Parsons, stated clerk of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) “This is unacceptable, especially from a company that has prided itself on using U.S.-made products. Therefore, the PC(USA) joins the Coalition of Immokalee Workers in calling on Wendy’s to sign a Fair Food agreement.”

The FFP is a partnership between farmworkers, Florida tomato growers and more than a dozen major food retailers. Under the agreement, participating retailers agree to only purchase from suppliers who meet a worker-driven Code of Conduct, including a zero-tolerance policy on slavery and sexual harassment. In addition, retailers pay a penny-per-pound premium which makes its way directly to the workers. In the last five years, buyers have paid more than $20 million into the FFP.

The PC(USA) was the first Christian denomination to sign on for the national boycott, the timing of which anticipates the company’s annual meeting on May 26.

“We encourage Presbyterians to join the Wendy’s Boycott National Day of Prayer on May 23, and for those in the area, to gather outside Wendy’s corporate headquarters in Dublin, Ohio during the annual meeting,” said Andrew Kang Bartlett, associate for national hunger concerns, Presbyterian Hunger Program.

“The Presbyterian Mission Agency stands in solidarity with our sisters and brothers in the Coalition of Immokalee Workers in their longstanding struggle for fair labor practices in the agriculture industry,” said Tony De La Rosa, PMA’s interim executive director. “In so doing, we commit ourselves to advocate ‘…as a prophetic witness to Christ’s transforming justice by speaking and living out God’s truth and compassion.’”

Susan Sampson of Temple Terrace Presbyterian Church in Tampa says the board’s endorsement is for anyone who is an ally of the Campaign for Fair Food.

“The Presbyterian Hunger Program has been supportive of the Fair Food Program for many years and we are grateful that they continue to support the human rights of farmworkers, and have taken this step as well,” she said. “I wholeheartedly support the Fair Food Program and the Wendy’s boycott. I invite my fellow Presbyterians and all people of faith to join with the CIW in the boycott and make fair treatment of farmworkers common practice throughout the industry.”

The CIW’s Gerardo Reyes Chavez says the PC(USA) endorsement of the national boycott is great news for their campaign.

“We are appreciative of the hundreds of thousands of Presbyterians who have steadfastly stood beside farmworkers in making our vision of a just and dignified agricultural industry a reality through the FFP,” he said. “Today, Wendy’s has heard the call of farmworkers and Presbyterians together to take responsibility for human rights in their supply chain, and be part of a program that is ensuring justice for tens of thousands of farmworkers across Florida and the East Coast.”

In March, the CIW announced the launch of the Wendy’s boycott during a multi-state Workers’ Voice Tour where students and people of faith joined them in actions from Florida to New York and through out the southeast. The group organized a demonstration at the University of Louisville and met with PC(USA) leaders before continuing their tour.

Source: http://www.pcusa.org/news/2016/5/10/support-grows-national-boycott-wendys-restaurants/

Presbyterian Disaster Assistance shines light on immigration detention in new documentary

Presbyterian Disaster Assistance shines light on immigration detention in new documentary

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Presbyterian Disaster Assistance shines light on immigration detention in new documentary

Award-winning film focuses on detainees and those who minister to them

LOUISVILLE

Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (PDA), working in conjunction with Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Services (LIRS), has produced a new documentary on immigration detention in the U.S. “Locked in a Box” follows the lives of individuals who have fled their homelands in search of safety and freedom in the U.S. Instead, the road to freedom has led them to months, or even years, in detention. The film also provides insight on those ministering to the incarcerated.

“Everyone is talking about detention and immigration. We wanted to get at the heart of the issue and tell the human story,” said David Barnhart, film director. “What you see are people: fathers, mothers and children. What immigration detention is doing to families leaves me speechless.”

Susan Krehbiel is PDA catalyst for refugees and asylum and has spent significant time meeting with detainees and those ministering to the incarcerated.

“Personal contact is so important because detainees get lost in all of these debates,” she said. “There are people being held across the country who could use personal visits.”

PDA officials say the immigration detention system continues to expand with 27,000 to 34,000 immigrants in detention on any given day. Approximately 250 facilities, many for-profit, are scattered across the country.

“The response from Congress is enforcement first. Fixing the broken immigration system will come later,” said Krehbiel. “Everyone admits the laws are broken, but the focus is enforcement. We need to shift away from that approach.”

Working in partnership with LIRS, PDA has supported the development of visitation ministries, legal orientation programs and other community based services to help those who remain locked up.

“This film tries to lift up visitation ministry as a way for churches and others in the community to engage and see firsthand,” Barnhart said. “People have come out of the visitation experience unable to speak because they’re so angry and impacted by it.”

Barnhart said most of the detainees came to the U.S. to protect their families, seek freedom and a new life. Many, he said, were fleeing war, drug trafficking and gang violence where their families were threatened.

“Many people that come here have some form of post-traumatic stress and other serious issues,” said Barnhart. “One former detainee we talked to traveled through 12 different countries to escape religious persecution, torture and jail. Another saw his own son murdered by gangs and had to flee his country just to survive. They come here seeking asylum and then find themselves locked up for months and even years.”

Church officials believe incarceration is the problem and not the answer, saying there are other solutions that are much more humane and helpful to those who come to this country seeking freedom.

“Many of our partners provide community-based programs so immigrants could be released to a partner with the resources and support they need,” said Krehbiel. “Some of the delay in processing is the low number of immigration court judges. Those working now are overwhelmed with a backlog of cases and it slows down the process for people.”

PDA officials are encouraging churches to schedule screenings of the film as they have done with previous church documentaries.

“Just from word of mouth, we already have more than 30 churches that want to host screening events and panel discussions, inviting other churches and community members to participate in the conversation,” said Barnhart. “The film is a reflection piece that can facilitate discussion and find ways to engage and be involved through advocacy or visitation ministry. It can be a resource for the church and wider community.”

“This is a powerful documentary that will inspire Presbyterians to take part in detention visitation and to question our government’s practice of detaining migrant adults and families with children,” said Teresa Waggener, manager of the Office of Immigration Issues with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

Recently, the film won top honors in the Tryon International Film Festival in North Carolina. For more information on the film, click here.

 

Choose welcome, not fear

Choose welcome, not fear

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Choose welcome, not fear

Louisville

We are a world grieving. We mourn the many deaths, not only in Paris, but also in Beirut, Baghdad, and Egypt. Any sense of security we have had is badly compromised by these horrific events; moreover, our fear of ISIS grows with every successful execution of its violent agenda.

Much has been taken from us but we still hold the choice as to how we react in our grief and fear. Many politicians have rushed from grief to fearful judgment. More than half of the governors of our states have attempted to protect their citizens by issuing declarations denying entry of Syrian refugees into their states (as if all of the potential terrorists are Syrian). Some have gone so far as to call for denial of entry to all refugees at the present time, as if that will guarantee safety to the citizens of their state.

As U.S. governors pledge to refuse Syrian refugees within their states and some presidential hopefuls promise to abandon the refugee program altogether, we the people have a choice to make. We can choose to follow those who would have us hide in fear or we can choose hope.

Our nation, for decades, has chosen hope and welcome for those fleeing war and persecution. Since 1975, more than three million refugees have found safety and security within our nation’s borders. Right now 11 million Syrians cannot go to school, tend to their land, or raise their children in the place they know as home. They cannot do these things because they, themselves, have been terrorized for far too long by numerous factions, including their own government.

Do we choose to abandon our plan to protect these Syrians because the people who have been threatening them are now threatening the West as well? ISIS has taken lives; they have taken our sense of security. Do we now hand over our hope and compassion to them?

Obviously, we need to move forward with a disciplined response, expediting security checks such as those employed by the U.S. refugee admission program. To refuse certain persons who are fleeing terror and persecution because they are “Syrian” or of some other particular ethnic group is unjust and may be illegal under U.S. law. We can be disciplined and, at the same time, led to love beyond our own limited, fearful vision.

After the crucifixion of Jesus, the disciples hid in fear. They locked the doors but God had another plan. Jesus appeared to them and said, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you” (Jn. 20:21). We were not meant to hide. We were meant to walk out in hope and compassion.  Author, poet, and peace activist Wendell Berry wrote, “Healing is impossible in loneliness; it is the opposite of loneliness. Conviviality is healing. To be healed we must come with all the other creatures to the feast of Creation” (The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays, “The Body and the Earth,” p. 99). The way to end terror is to prove that those who demonize us are wrong. We are not a heartless secular culture. We must witness to the Gospel with generous hospitality. To hide in fear is a mistake. Fear is the ammunition of terror. Hope is the best defense.